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Wednesday
Feb252015

Blog 60 - Lisa Meadows Narrator of "A Ring A Dance A Second Chance"

As the author of A RING, A DANCE, A SECOND CHANCE, I am grateful to introduce Lisa Meadows, a highly  successful narrator of the audiobooks, for making my novel available in the marketplace.  Lisa visualized the love story of Katie and Taylor in her initial reading of my book, and through her narration was able to create and show the emotions of the characters in each chapter reading.  I was impressed as she fulfilled the narration of the story, and how the flow of her reading continually created an interest in each chapter she narrated. 

Audiobook of "A Ring A Dance A Second Chance”, is now available at I-Tunes, Audible, and Amazon.  Click on the link below to play an audio sample of the audiobook:  

http://www.audible.com/pd/Romance/A-Ring-a-Dance-a-Second-Chance-Audiobook/B00T8EJY4W/ref=a_search_c4_1_1_srTtl?qid=1423257982&sr=1-1

Tuesday
Feb242015

Blog 59: AudioBook Release " A Ring A Dance A Second Chance"

A Ring, a Dance, a Second Chance

Click on this link below to review and hear a portion of this romantic story about love in the senior years. 

Jonell Kirby Cash's love story picks up Katie and Taylor's romance right where it left off: in their senior year of high school. However, Katie isn't the same girl Taylor remembers. As a widow she values her independence, living alone, and making new friends--and when Taylor calls Katie, she is on the threshold of exploring herself in the larger world. Taylor, ever the old-fashioned man, is surprised by the new, vibrant Katie.

The two must learn how to rid themselves of their old memories and expectations and learn to accept the 50 years of change that has taken place. A Ring, a Dance, a Second Chance is a novel about love--at any age.

Great reviews.  http://www.audible.com/pd/Romance/A-Ring-a-Dance-a-Second-Chance-Audiobook/B00T8EJY4W/ref=a_search_c4_1_1_srTtl?qid=1423257982&sr=1-1

 

Monday
Jun162014

Blog 58 - Love Reality---

I found a card that my husband wrote me.  He had counted the days we’d had together and then he thanked me for the love we’d shared each day.  I read his card several times and I found it lodged in my brain many hours later.  From that, my poem was born.  Jonell Kirby Cash

 

Monday
Nov042013

Blog 57: Second Chance at "LOVE"

“Learning how to love, how to communicate, how to understand, how to empathize, how to forgive and how to reconcile are all effective skills that should be developed,”  

“Well”, I thought, “perhaps I could share some of the things I’ve learned about aging well through embracing change and managing the challenges that are part of active living.  I thought about the challenges I faced when, in my seventies, I decided to write my first novel about a “second chance at love”- –a story of a couple, alone again after the death of their spouses, and their children busy with their own careers and families.  I had to put myself, psychologically, in the role of my characters, both the female and the male, to grasp their feelings and understand their motivations and fears.  (Of course that meant I left many reams of crumpled paper on the floor before my story was told.)

The statement, I’ve underlined above, speaks to the very real concerns that all of us have faced at some point when we interact with others—at any emotional level.  I’m sure that all of us have experienced a situation where we spoke up, intending to be helpful, but what we said was not understood to be what we meant --and we realized we missed the mark. 

It is true that we need to confront our own inability to say what we mean and mean what we say…that’s the first step in clear communication.  What we say will not be clear to someone else if we are not clear in our own minds about what we want the person to hear.  Even then, the words may not have the same meaning to the person spoken to as it does to the one speaking.  So, with a simple exchange you can have four different points where misunderstanding can occur:

            For example, with the simplest communication, we have the following:  (a) what the speaker said, (b) and what the speaker meant; and then from the listener, (c) what was heard and (d) what the listener understood it to mean.  

            Think about this:  if communication can be helpful—for the same reason it can be hurtful.  Most of us want to be helpful when we comment, instruct or question others.  You can master the skills of effective or helpful communication and actually open communication so that the exchange is both interesting and useful.  

Tuesday
Oct012013

Blog 56: "6 Ways to Live Your Best Life After 50" 

The Best Is Yet to Come!  Enjoy it!

Question: Why is being over 50 the best time of life?
Answer: Because unlike previous life stages—college, career, parenting—“middle age” is all about  two words, “Me” and “I”.

“Middle age is a time when the kids are probably on their own, your career may be winding down, and you can finally focus on you,” says Barbara Hannah Grufferman, author of The Best of Everything After Fifty .”It’s a time to take stock, make changes and pursue your passions.” Just how do you seize the day exactly?   Try These simple items!

      1. Be Selfish—In a Good Way

After years of taking care of everyone else’s needs, it’s time to make you a priority. “You need to take charge of your physical, financial, and emotional health,” says Grufferman, “or you won’t be operating at peak performance.”

What to do:
If exercise isn’t part of your routine, commit to it—even if it’s only in 10-minute sessions. (You’ll have more energy and feel healthier.) If you haven’t done serious financial planning, it’s not too late. Make an appointment with a financial adviser.  And, lastly, dedicate time each day or week to doing something that brings you pleasure. Say "No!" to anything—other than an emergency—that threatens to interrupt that time. (Seriously!)

2. Hang Out With Younger People

”The world is changing rapidly, “says Grufferman, “and the best way to understand change is to be around young people who ‘get’ it.” And who also get joy out of explaining it to someone genuinely interested. (Bonus: it’s not a one-way street. Younger people can learn a lot from you, too!)

What to do:
Spend time with your grandkids! If they’re not close by, consider hiring a neighbor kid to help you with a big task, like cleaning out the garage or organizing photos. Call the admissions office at your local college to see if they offer “senior audit,” the chance to sit in on an undergraduate class for free or a nominal fee. Or sign up to mentor a high school student who needs some extra attention. (Contact VolunteerMatch.org.)
 

3. Reignite the Flame

You’ve been married or with a partner for years. You love each other. But intimacy got lost somewhere between the kids and the grandkids and the demanding job. Now is the time to rekindle the passion between the sheets, especially since time and privacy are on your side.

What to do: Barring any physical problems (which you should handle together), the solution, according to Esther Perel, a family and marriage therapist and author of Mating in Captivity, seems initially counter-intuitive. Though you have more time to spend together, carve out time away from each other to develop your “otherness.” Her research suggests that separation creates erotic desire. If this approach doesn't work for you, try these tips for firing up your sex life.

Jonell Kirby Cash, author of “A Ring A Dance A Second Chance” writes about a couple experiencing a second chance at marriage after the death of their spouses.  It is Katie’s and Taylor’s love story, high school sweethearts, reunited after the death of both spouses, 40 years later.  The two learn how to rid themselves of their old memories and expectations and learn to accept the years of change that has taken place.  The story is a blending of families and courting at a senior age of life. The novel is a real Romantic Fiction:  "Slice of Life Story"  

4. Guard Against Falls

If you can only commit to one health change, vow to prevent falling, the leading cause of injury among people 65 and older. Even a non-injury fall can having devastating psychological implications, causing you to be fearful of activity and thus…. prone to falling again.

What to do: Exercise (think yoga and tai chi for balance and flexibility, weight bearing exercises for strength), and make sure you’re getting plenty of calcium and vitamin D (to protect against osteoporosis). You also might want to check with your doctor if you feel like any medications you are taking are making you dizzy or light-headed. And get a vision exam to see if you need a new prescription. (Of course, low-heeled shoes with rubber soles are best—and watch where you walk!) To learn more about how to protect yourself against falls, click here.
 

5. Seize the Day!

You’ve saved for retirement and are putting off travel, for example, while you’re in your prime until you feel totally secure—maybe in 10 years or so. Smart move? Not really. You have to seize the day, but do so wisely.
 

What to do: First, gather the facts. Do you have enough disposable income to travel without seriously impacting your future? (To calculate, go to a web site like T. Rowe Price or MoneyChimp.com.) Factor in any current or possible health issues (based on family history.) Then ask yourself: "How important is this to me/us?" If money is a little tight, look for places to cut back on daily spending and start a travel fund. Or take a part-time job to earn extra money. The key here is to dedicate time and resources to enjoying life now—not later! 

       

6. Simplify, Simplify, Simplify

Who of us at this age needs a 30-minute makeup routine? Or a house full of clutter? Or a list of meaningless obligations or non-nurturing friend’s Middle age is about letting go of non-essentials. And letting go allows us to move forward. That’s where we should be headed.

What to do: Ask yourself this question: "What is my vision for my best future?" Write down your answers. (Example: to see family and friends at least three times a week, to be in good enough health to play tennis and golf, to tend to and enjoy a beautiful garden, to take my grandkids to 10 national parks, to look my best.) Everything you do should line up with the realization of the vision. Anything that doesn’t support it? Bu-bye!

Jonell Kirby Cash, author of “A Ring A Dance A Second Chance” writes about a couple experiencing a second chance at marriage after the death of their spouses.  It is Katie’s and Taylor’s love story, high school sweethearts, reunited after the death of both spouses, 50 years later.  The two learn how to rid themselves of their old memories and expectations and learn to accept the years of change that has taken place.  The story is a blending of families and courting at a senior age of life. The novel is a real Romantic Fiction:  "Slice of Life Story".